The Student-Designed Design Conference

DSC_0354Last week Jefferson ID students produced a new edition of TANDEM, the yearly student-run design conference that’s fast become a high point of Fall semesters in the program. This year’s TANDEM conference was held in the DEC Center at Jefferson’s East Falls campus and included a full day of speakers and workshops connecting students from Jefferson and surrounding universities with professionals from all corners of design.

DSC_0556Students enjoyed presentations by professional designers from a broad range of areas including footwear design, architecture, fashion, virtual reality, and many more. Allan Chochinov, founder of Core77 and Chair of the SVA Products of Design MFA Program delivered the keynote lecture, speaking about creating greater impact with the least amount of design.DSC_0520

Workshops and demonstrations included CAD for virtual reality, 360 degree video, 3D printing, and wax casting. Hamid Holloman, a Philadelphia-based fashion designer, hosted a soft goods workshop where students learned the finer points of bag design utilizing textiles created by Jefferson textile design students.IMG_6661

In addition to the networking opportunities, attendees also benefitted from portfolio and resume reviews by many of the speakers as well as local design firms. Congratulations to the student organizing team on another impressive event!

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A SUMMER OF DESIGN: Startups

Screen Shot 2018-09-13 at 11.43.39 AMJefferson ID Seniors Adam Hecht and Alex Tholl have launched a joint effort to propel the work of inventors, entrepreneurs and product startups. The duo officially came together as DiveDesign after years of working together on class projects and design competitions.

Immersing themselves in the entrepreneurship and inventor communities, Adam and Alex quickly observed a dramatic shortage of affordable industrial design services in this area. They realized they could use their skills to could bridge this gap and assembled a suite of design services tailored to the unique needs of startups and inventors. From physical prototypes to user interaction to specifications for mass manufacturing, DiveDesign can bring an inventor’s vision to life.

And they’re assembling an impressive track record of doing just that. Since their launch, DiveDesign has successfully partnered with an array of entrepreneurs and companies such as Anne London, SparkCharge, Innovation Factory and Performance Brands.

Read more about DiveDesign here.

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A SUMMER OF DESIGN: Internships

1011171311Senior Jefferson ID student Alison Schlicher (BsID’19) used this past summer to gain invaluable experience in her concentration area of Furniture Design. Alison sought out and completed an internship at the Danish firm of Bruun Olsen Flet located in Hillerød, Denmark.

Alison initially approached the firm due to their world-renowned expertise in the art of caning. This ancient technique for creating chair seats involves weaving intricate patterns using rattan (strips of bark from the rattan palm). This was an ability Alison wanted to add to the furniture design skill set she’s been developing at Jefferson. Bruun Olsen Flet proved to be a great place to do just that.

During the course of here time there, Alison had the opportunity to work directly with the firm’s principal, Thomas Bruun Olsen. She proved a fast learner as evidenced by the project that she was soon given to work on: the restoration of an antique chair from the Danish Royal Court, one of the few with its original gold foil finish still intact. Alison wasn’t deterred by having the Queen of Denmark as a client and after finishing the first chair, also completed a second.

The internship gave her uninterrupted time to understand the nuance of working with rattan: from learning a variety of weaving techniques to accounting for outside factors such as humidity that cause the material to behave differently.

It was a well-spent summer that enabled Alison to expand her skills, her portfolio and her circle of professional colleagues worldwide.

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A SUMMER OF DESIGN: Competitions

The awards ceremony at the RESNA Student Design Competition. The Jefferson team was awarded the “Most Likely to Become Commercially Available” award as well as second place overall.

The awards ceremony at the RESNA Student Design Competition. The Jefferson team was awarded the “Most Likely to Become Commercially Available” award as well as second place overall.

Summer is the time that Industrial Design students at Jefferson take the skills they’ve learned in the classroom out into the world via internships, startups, collaborations and competitions. To celebrate the beginning of
our Fall semester, we’ll be doing a special series of articles about the many ways that Jefferson Industrial Design students used this summer.

This summer a cross-disciplinary team from Jefferson’s Spring 2018 Healthcare and Design class won the “Most Likely to Become Commercially Available” award and second place overall in the RESNA (Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America) Student Design Competition in Washington, DC. Out of forty teams entered, the Jefferson group was one of only seven selected to present their final project at this international competition that included entries from India and South Korea. The team designed GaitMate, a device that reduces the frequency and duration of Freezing of Gait (FOG) episodes for individuals with Parkinson’s Disease.

The team consisted of Sophomore Industrial Design students Jess Monteleone and Zach Samalonis as well as Ocupational Therapy Masters student Abigail Balster. They created the project as part of their work in Healthcare & Design, a class that brings together Industrial Design students and Occupational Therapy Masters students to collaborate on the research and design of new medical products and solutions.

A video of the prototype device can be found here: https://youtu.be/jJBoIjJmipo

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VISUAL DIARY: Industrial Design Students Visit Hong Kong & China

The skyline of Shanghai, the third stop on our journey.

The skyline of Shanghai, the third stop on our journey.   Image: Chetna Sharma

 

Students from the Jefferson Industrial Design Programs (BsID and MsID) recently travelled to Hong Kong and China as part of our annual Study Abroad China Trip.

The journey is designed to give students firsthand experience with Asian design, prototyping and manufacturing capabilities as well as allow them to get comfortable moving independently within Asian cities and design cultures. The trip’s 10-day timeframe coincides perfectly with the University’s Spring Break period so there’s no classes for students to catch up on when they return.

Many of our alumni report that one of their first responsibilities when they were hired for their first ID position was to travel to Asia to oversee various parts of the design and manufacturing process. This trip gives students a broad-based preview of that so they can truly hit the ground running upon graduation.

Over the course of ten event-filled days, the group made stops in Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Shanghai visiting design schools, electronics markets, prototyping facilities and major manufacturers. Following is a short visual diary of the trip…

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Location, Location, Location

By Zach Samalonis

Jefferson University East Falls campus is home to the Jefferson Industrial Design Department. And its location is truly everything. The East Falls location is unique, one that many universities can’t say they have. Located only 20 minutes from Center City Philadelphia, students on the Jefferson East Falls campus can reap all the benefits of one of the largest cities in the country, without having to deal with the troubles of living right in the middle. It also means that students are close to several large art museums and galleries, many of which design students can enter for free. But one of the greatest benefits is being in the Philadelphia area is its proximity to other major cities such as Washington DC (a 3-hour drive) and New York (a 2-hour drive).

Photo-2Recently the Industrial Design 4 class, led by Professor Lyn Godley and Ken Root, arranged a full day trip to New York. The class first ventured to NY NOW, a tradeshow for wholesale buyers looking to filling inventory for the year. With over 2,300 vendors in categories such as the HOME Collection (“discover innovative designs, wholesale home décor, including furnishings and home textiles, tabletop and gourmet housewares”), and the HANDMADE Collection (“for artisanal cross-category crafts, from production designer maker to global handmade resources”). Students were tasked with exploring what vendors had to offer in terms of both innovative designs as well as sustainability practices and measures.

IMG_6130One of the focuses of the Design 4 semester is lighting design, so the class ventured uptown to visit Jason Krugman, public artist and lighting designer based in New York City. After viewing some of his work, Jason explained his journey of becoming a designer and how he began creating his innovative lighting installations. “It was inspiring to know that he had troubles making the lighting pieces but eventually found the right process to make it work,” said Tori March “in the end the pieces came out beautifully.”

IMG_6126The final destination of the day was a visit to Material Connexion. Material Connexion is the world’s leading materials library and consultancy, where a global team of materials scientists and experts help creatives across industries. Here, students were able to explore a library of new, innovative materials and integrate them into their designs. Jefferson University also has a digital subscription to the Material Connexion database. With this, students are able to explore materials online, and even request samples from manufacturers.

Trips like these are what makes the Jefferson Industrial Program unique. Students gain both the experience of visiting various galleries, trade shows and museums, while also getting the chance to network with designers who are currently working in the field. Philadelphia is a continuously growing in the world of design and Jefferson University is right in the mix.

 

 

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Sprint 2018: An Insider View

1 (1) By Zach Samalonis

It has been a long running tradition in the Jefferson Industrial Design Department to host the Sprint Challenge. Sprint gives the students a taste of what it is like to be a real designer, working with real clients. This year’s client was JeffSolves, a project incubator created to generate innovative approaches for diseases that lack effective treatments and could benefit from new therapies developed at Jefferson. Sprint gives Jefferson ID students an experience that they would not receive anywhere else. Here are some of the top benefits of participating in the Sprint project:

Sprint lets you connect with others in the department you might not have had the chance to meet.

Because of the way Sprint teams are structured, usually every group will have a freshman, sophomore, junior, senior and sometimes a graduate student. Working on a project like this allows you to make new connections and really see the depth of the program. “I think Sprint is great because you get to interact with a lot of people that you may not talk to normally,” said sophomore Jess Monteleone. “There’s always a lot you can learn from working with upperclassmen.” Sprint gives you somebody to look up to (or someone to look after). New friendships are formed, and it really defines what “studio culture” means at Jefferson University.

You learn as a freshman what it is like to work with a real client.
From day one at Jefferson, freshman are told that they will be treated like real designers. While the studio classes are structured to teach this, Sprint is the first time freshman get to see what it is like to work with real clients. You learn that design isn’t a linear process and a ton can change after you present your initial ideas.

1 (3)

You learn what you are good at… and where you need to improve.
Each year, Sprint forces you to work quickly. The design process is vastly condensed to a week’s time, so skills become very important. This is where working as a team comes into play. Sometimes one person is good at sketching while another is great at CAD. Sprint week is a great time to use your team, pick up some skills, and share what you know.

Your experience includes the good and the bad.
Sprint week can be both fun and stressful. But sometimes, things don’t go as planned. Models can get messed up and ideas can get trashed. A lot of the experience is learning how to both manage a team and stay on task. You will learn that sometimes the leaders aren’t just the Juniors but other members of the team. The best Sprint projects are the ones where all the members are able to work together and express their ideas.

You learn a ton in just a week’s time.
After the presentations, you have some time to reflect on your experience and absorb all that you learned. Sophomore Charles Barilo said, “It’s always great to take a step back at the presentations at the end of the week and look around and realize how much incredible work is accomplished in only a week’s time.” At the end of the day each group has a great portfolio piece and you can talk about your experience in job interviews.1 (2)

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The 2018 ID Sprint Project: Examining the Adolescent Patient Experience with JeffSolves.

The Project Launch in the Hayward Hall ID Studios

The Project Launch in the Hayward Hall ID Studios

In this year’s Industrial Design Sprint Project, students are partnering with JeffSolves to design the future of the adolescent patient experience. JeffSolves a project incubator created to generate innovative approaches for diseases that lack effective treatments and could benefit from new therapies developed at Jefferson.

The Sprint Project itself is very much a tradition in the ID Dept. In fact, this semester marks the 18th year this unique project has run. Here’s how it works: students are divided up into multi-year groups from across the program, one student from each year including grad students. The undergrad Junior in each team serves as team manager. An outside client  (this year, JeffSolves) is brought in and the teams concentrate their collective efforts on the Project Brief for that client. All classes in both the Graduate and Undergraduate ID programs are dedicated to the project for the span of one week and work continues around the clock.

It’s a project that students have found to be of tremendous value year after year, especially in regard to their portfolio development. It serves as evidence that the student knows what it means to work with a real-world client and that they’re able to navigate the inherent demands of such a project.

We look forward to great week of close collaboration and insightful design!

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Industrial Design Student Wins 1st Place in International Lighting Competition

With his “Interwoven Luminance” project, industrial design senior Richard Stone topped more than 650 students and professionals in Luflex’s LG OLED Design Competition.

With his “Interwoven Luminance” project, industrial design senior Richard Stone topped more than 650 students and professionals in Luflex’s LG OLED Design Competition.

Industrial design senior Richard Stone won first place and the $5,000 prize in Luflex’s LG OLED Design Competition, besting more than 650 students and professionals from around the world. Seven renowned designers and art directors selected the winners.

The competition tasked competitors with incorporating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) into their designs. Unlike LEDs, which are a point light source, OLEDs are very thin, flat surfaces that light evenly across the entire surface, explained Lyn Godley, associate professor of industrial design at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University). They can be rigid or flexible, opaque or clear, offering new applications for lighting design.

With his “Interwoven Luminance” project, senior Richard Stone project topped more than 650 students and professionals in Luflex’s LG OLED Design Competition.

Richard Stone developed the winning project in the University’s new luminaire design course.

Stone’s “Interwoven Luminance” project was inspired by textiles and a simple weave pattern that highlights OLED’s flexibility.

“The woven pattern creates a three-dimensional form that only an OLED could deliver while providing uniform illumination,” he said. “Developing a modular solution through which individual units can attach together allows the flexibility of Interwoven Luminance to be implemented in multiple spaces. This design was an accumulation of everything I have learned in my three and a half years at Jefferson.”

Stone, who’s concentrating in lighting design, developed the project in the University’s new luminaire design course taught by Godley.

“This is a huge win for our student and for what it says about the new curriculum in lighting design at Jefferson,” Godley said.

In addition to the $5,000 prize, Stone will receive travel expenses to attend the International Light + Building conference in Frankfurt, Germany, in March. Here, he will exhibit his design, with manufacturing of the mock-up supported by LG, plus receive a 3 percent royalty upon production.

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Masters ID Student Takes First Place in Annual Top Ram Competition

TopRamBy Zach Samalonis

Seven teams of Jefferson students from the East Falls and Center City campuses recently pitched their ideas in the DEC Center Forum to a panel of judges for the annual Top Ram Competition. This year’s winner was Masters Industrial Design student Julia Anthony, whose idea was “SOLU-tion”, a dual chamber auto-injector for people with adrenal insufficiency disorders. The device is designed as a fast and effective way to dispense medication in emergency situations.

After the presentations, a Q&A with the judges followed. Finalists were scored on concept, research, storytelling, business model design/feasibility and innovation.

After finding out she had just won the Matt Glass Award for Entrepreneurship Anthony said, “I’m really excited – I’ve had this idea for a long time.”

The Award comes with several benefits including a $1,000 prize. Julia said she plans to use the funds to prototype more generations of the device. In addition, she also will receive a free consultation with a lawyer to support her idea, as well as meet with Dr. Steven Glass, who sponsors the competition in memory of his son Matthew Glass.

This is the second time an Industrial Design student has won the competition. The first was in 2015 when Renee Kakareka (BsID’16), won for her smart glasses to help the hearing impaired. She was accepted into the Angel Venture Fair the following semester and went on to win the $5,000 JAZ Tank pitch competition. Development of the concept is now in the final prototype stage through her company Olive Devices.

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