Architecture Alumna’s Work on Display at MoMA

Kristy Balliet’s proposed Loud Lines installation at MoMA PS1 invites people to inhabit the courtyard “between the lines.

Kristy Balliet’s proposed Loud Lines installation at MoMA PS1 invites people to inhabit the courtyard “between the lines.” The project will be on display at MoMA until Sept. 3. (Image/courtesy BairBalliet)

Architecture alumna Kristy Balliet ’99 and her firm BairBalliet have been selected to show their work at New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) as part of its Young Architects Program.

This year’s competition challenged architects to develop creative designs for a temporary outdoor installation that provides shade, seating and water, as well as addresses environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling.

Balliet’s proposed Loud Lines installation at the MoMA PS1 nonprofit art center in Long Island City, N.Y., invites people to inhabit the courtyard “between the lines,” she said.

“Loud Lines are formally idiosyncratic as they abide by structural vector logics but feature peculiar intersections,” Balliet described. “Loud Lines are materially nuanced as they’re both colorless—black by day—and vibrantly colorful—pulsing a neon glow by night. Loud Lines exude atmosphere, cooling the courtyard with misting water and rendering their solidity as porous. Loud Lines present themselves as both bold urban icons—reaching high in the sky—and background frames—providing a backdrop to the party. Bucking the tradition of canopies or objects, Loud Lines offers a series of drawn frames that form a variety of rooms each with their own spatial characteristics, suggesting a multitude of audiences and engagement.”

She calls the project “playful” and hopes visitors, especially young people, will see it and walk away thinking about drawing, architecture and everyday objects in a new way. Loud Lines will be on display at MoMA until Sept. 3.

Balliet credits Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University), then known as Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science, with helping to launch her career and teaching her how to be resourceful. “I learned very early, thanks to several great professors in my foundational years, that architecture is expansive,” she said. “In order to make an impact, you had to make choices and spend your energy developing a point of view.”

Posted in University Headlines