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Stephen K. Klasko, MD, MBA, president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health, and PhilaU President Stephen Spinelli Jr., PhD, sign the Combination Agreement.

Stephen K. Klasko, MD, MBA, president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health, and PhilaU President Stephen Spinelli Jr., PhD, sign the Combination Agreement in September.

To create value for today’s students, universities must embrace change and prepare students to adapt to the dynamic work environment they will encounter throughout their careers, said Philadelphia University president Stephen Spinelli Jr., in a recent interview with the Huffington Post.

PhilaU recognized the need for an enhanced approach to education almost a decade ago. “We knew that for today’s and tomorrow’s college students to be successful, we had to disrupt the traditional, outmoded ways in which people learn,” Spinelli said. “We have developed a transdisciplinary approach called Nexus Learning. It empowers students to work together across different disciplines, form teams with other students and faculty, engage with companies, help identify real-world problems and come up with innovative solutions that create value. It is one of the reasons our graduates can boast a 95 percent job and graduate school placement rate.”

PhilaU will continue to create a whole new model for higher education with its planned combination with Thomas Jefferson University. The comprehensive university will focus on professional education to prepare students for 21st-century careers with an emphasis on scientific and applied research, design thinking and discovery.

“Delivering on a more robust value proposition for students is at the heart of it,” Spinelli told Huffington Post. “Higher education is increasingly driven by the changing workplace. Society needs productive citizens who have learned how to change, while being productive as they change. Are students prepared to change jobs every few years? Are they prepared to create their own jobs? Are they prepared to shape their jobs as they evolve? Are they prepared to solve complicated and complex problems? At our university, everything we offer is designed to help our students answer ‘yes!’ to these questions.”

Read the full Huffington Post interview here.

Fashion merchandising and management students Alyssa Tomaseck and Ashley Dibona and Nioka Wyatt, program director, were interviewed for a Fox29 segment on PhilaU’s fashion pop-up shop that aired live Dec. 3.

Watch the Fox29 report on PhilaU’s pop-up shop here.

The students create all the merchandise and plan all aspects of the semi-annual pop-up shop, which raised more than $5,400 at last week’s event. More than $35,000 total from PhilaU pop-up shops have been donated to the non-profit ChemoClothes.

The pop-up shop provides an outstanding educational experience for students and also teaches them about social responsibility and giving back to the community.

Read more about the pop-up shop here.

 

 

 

President Stephen Spinelli Jr. explains how PhilaU’s innovative model of education is leading the way to the future of higher education, in a Huffington Post interview published Dec. 5.

“We knew that for today’s and tomorrow’s college students to be successful, we had to disrupt the traditional, outmoded ways in which people learn. We have developed a transdisciplinary approach called Nexus Learning,” Spinelli said. “It empowers students to work together across different disciplines, form teams with other students and faculty, engage with companies, help identify real-world problems and come up with innovative solutions that create value. It is one of the reasons our graduates can boast a 95 percent job and graduate school placement rate.”

On the planned integration of PhilaU and Thomas Jefferson University, Spinelli said the combination “will take what both universities have already accomplished and create a new institution focused on 21st century professional education that intends to transform higher education and further enhance value for students, graduates and employers.”

Stephen Klasko, M.D., MBA, president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health, was quoted in the article, noting, “It’s the start of a revolution in how students are taught, in how we provide greater value in more customized offerings.”

PhilaU student entrepreneur Jordan DeCicco ’20 is scoring high on the basketball court and in the business world, CBSPhilly reported Dec. 4.

On Saturday, DeCicco posted 14 points and 16 rebounds for the Rams, and recently won the Global Student Entrepreneur Award for his company, Sunniva, which sells an organic, coffee energy drink that he developed in his PhilaU residence hall room.

Read the PhilaU Today story here.

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-10-57-44-amThe Philadelphia University women’s volleyball team gave the University of New Haven all it could handle in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament Thursday evening at Daemen College, but the Rams came up just short in a nail-biting match 3-2 (25-20, 20-25, 27-25, 22-25, 16-14).

The Rams—who made the NCAA Tournament after winning their first Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference title—end the season with an overall record of 29-5. The 29 victories are the third most in program history.

Read more here.

Philadelphia University fashion merchandising and management students Alyssa Tomaseck and Ashley Dibona will be interviewed about this week’s pop-up shop by Fox29 on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 8:15 a.m.

The pop-up shop, which featured a wide array of handcrafted items made by PhilaU students, raised more than $5,400 for the non-profit ChemoClothes.

Read more here.

 

pop up shopDespite the rainy weather outside, the Kanbar Performance Space buzzed with activity as PhilaU fashion merchandising and management students sold their handcrafted merchandise at the Nov. 30 pop-up shop, raising more than $5,400 for charity.

Within 10 minutes of opening, customers had bought up half of the distressed and hand-painted denim jackets for sale at $30 each, and the rest went pretty quickly. “We thought we would sell a lot, but not this fast,” said freshman Alex Snyder, whose group developed the jackets.

The denim jackets sold out quickly.

The denim jackets sold out quickly.

In addition to making all the merchandise, some 200 students—enrolled in global fashion insight, retail strategy and structure, and visual merchandising courses—organized and styled the pop-up shop, with oversight from faculty members.

The event raised $5,450 to benefit ChemoClothes, a South Jersey nonprofit that helps families affected by cancer. To date, more than $35,000 has been donated to the organization from PhilaU pop-up shops.

“It’s an amazing turnout,” said Nioka Wyatt, fashion merchandising and management program director, as students and faculty browsed the throw pillows, clutches, kimonos, chokers, key chains and more on display. “It shows that hard work pays off, and it’s definitely something to put on their resume.”

Wyatt said the pop-up shop allows students to gain a variety of real-world skills to prepare them for the job market, including collaborating with others, dealing with customers and understanding the supply-chain process.

One group of students used old vinyl records to make chokers.

One group made chokers out of old vinyl records.

“It required a lot of teamwork and gave us experience to work together as a company,” agreed junior Erica Christensen, whose group divvied up a variety of responsibilities, such as marketing, development and production, to create their rock ’n’ roll patchwork sweatshirts.

In addition to Wyatt, other PhilaU fashion merchandising and management faculty involved in the pop-up shop include Pielah Kim, Juliana Guglielmi and Dave Loranger.

PhilaU fashion merchandising and management students raised more than $5,400 for charity at the Nov. 30 pop-up shop, NBC10 reported Nov. 30 on the noon and 4 p.m. newscasts. The students developed handcrafted items for sale, including denim jackets, chokers, tops, leggings and kimonos, and also planned and styled the event.

Herb Magee, who was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2011, is one of the most decorated coaches in the history of the sport.

Herb Magee is one of the most decorated coaches in the history of the sport. He was honored Thursday, Dec. 1.

Philadelphia University men’s basketball head coach Herb Magee received the inaugural Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference (CACC) Award of Distinction on Thursday, Dec. 1, before the Rams took on conference rival University of the Sciences in the Gallagher Athletic Center.

The CACC created the award to recognize current coaches or administrators who have represented the conference with class and dignity during their distinguished careers.

“Herb Magee is a terrific individual to receive the inaugural CACC Award of Distinction,” said CACC Commissioner Dan Mara. “Not only is he a terrific basketball coach, but he’s an outstanding person who demonstrates great character and sportsmanship that his student-athletes quickly identify with.”

Magee, who was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2011, is one of the most decorated coaches in the history of the sport. Now in his 50th season as head coach, Magee has won 1,037 games—the most in NCAA Division II men’s basketball history and the second-highest total across all three divisions—and the 1970 national championship.

Magee is only the fourth men’s basketball head coach in NCAA history to coach 50 years, and he did it all at his alma mater, where he was one of the highest-scoring players in Rams’ history.

During Magee’s tenure, the Rams have been to the NCAA Tournament 29 times and have earned 33 20-plus-win seasons and 11 25-plus-win seasons—including a school-record 30 victories during the 1992-93 campaign. His coaching has produced 44 1,000-point scorers and three 2,000-point scorers. Since joining the CACC in 2005, the Rams have won four conference championships.

Magee also has been honored for his outstanding character and commitment to the game, most recently when he received the Joe Lapchick Character Award Nov. 18. His many other accomplishments include receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Philadelphia Sports Congress in 2007 and being named a Guardian of the Game by the National Association of Basketball Coaches in 2005 and a Living Legend by the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association in 2012.

As a freshman at PhilaU, Jordan DeCicco co-founded Sunniva Caffe, a protein-packed, all-natural, ready-to-drink coffee beverage.

Jordan DeCicco co-founded Sunniva Caffe, a protein-packed, all-natural, ready-to-drink coffee beverage.

Philadelphia University business student Jordan DeCicco ’20 has won the 2016 Global Student Entrepreneur Awards (GSEA) regional competition in Washington, D.C., hosted by the Entrepreneurs’ Organization. He will compete in the national competition in Kansas City, Mo., on March 6, 2017.

As a freshman at PhilaU, DeCicco co-founded Sunniva Caffe, a protein-packed, all-natural, ready-to-drink coffee beverage. He was one of four finalists selected to compete this month in the regional competition, during which student entrepreneurs presented their businesses, leadership skills and entrepreneurial practices to a panel of entrepreneurs.

After a futile search for a healthy iced coffee drink to boost his energy before 5 a.m. basketball practices, DeCicco conjured up a ramped-up coffee drink in his PhilaU residence hall room, and soon his teammates were asking for it, too.

DeCicco partnered with his brother Jake, a Georgetown University alumnus, to create Sunniva Caffe and worked with PhilaU’s Blackstone LaunchPad to develop the product and define the company’s vision, which is to provide an easy, healthy and convenient way for consumers to energize and be health-conscious.

“I am so excited to have been selected to compete in the national GSEA competition,” DeCicco said. “I can’t say enough how grateful I am for the opportunity to share my story and the mission behind my company.”

For his win, DeCicco received a $2,000 cash prize plus a trip to the national competition, where a winner will be selected to represent the U.S. in the global finals in Frankfurt, Germany.

Jordan DeCicco worked with PhilaU’s Blackstone LaunchPad to develop the product.

Jordan DeCicco worked with PhilaU’s Blackstone LaunchPad to develop the product.

“Jordan encompasses what GSEA is about, and I know he will continue to go far in his endeavors,” said Michael Goldstein, president of Entrepreneurs’ Organization D.C. and founder/CEO of SwitchPitch.

The GSEA competition is open to undergraduates who also are primarily responsible for the operation of a revenue-generating business. It’s one of the largest and fastest-growing global competitions for student participants, the organization said.

Read more about Jordan DeCicco here.