Weather Forecast for Philadelphia

Partly Cloudy
Thursday 06/21 20%
Partly Cloudy
Partly cloudy. Lows overnight in the mid 60s.
Chance of Rain
Friday 06/22 30%
Chance of Rain
A few showers early with overcast skies later in the day. High 72F. Winds E at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 30%.
Thunderstorm
Saturday 06/23 90%
Thunderstorm
Thunderstorms. High 79F. Winds ESE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 90%.
Partly Cloudy
Sunday 06/24 20%
Partly Cloudy
Intervals of clouds and sunshine. A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. High near 85F. Winds W at 10 to 15 mph.
Partly Cloudy
Monday 06/25 10%
Partly Cloudy
Some clouds in the morning will give way to mainly sunny skies for the afternoon. High 81F. Winds NNW at 10 to 15 mph.

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Jefferson had 13 student-athletes named to the CACC Track and Field All-Academic Teams to lead the conference.

Jefferson had 13 student-athletes named to the CACC Track and Field All-Academic Teams to lead the conference.

Seventy-three student-athletes have been named to Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference (CACC) All-Academic Teams for the 2017-18 season. In addition, women’s rowing—which doesn’t compete in the CACC—had eight students recognized as Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association Scholar-Athletes.

“Their successes reinforce the emphasis our University places on student and athlete,” said Tom Shirley, assistant vice president for athletics and head women’s basketball coach at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University). “Our overall departmental GPA of 3.4 and our 97 percent graduation rate speak volumes to the quality of the men and women our coaches are recruiting.”

Women’s soccer led all Jefferson sports, as well as the conference, with 13 Rams named to the All-Academic Team. Eight members of the women’s track and field team and five students from the men’s track and field squad made their respective All-Academic Teams to also top the CACC.

Three-time honorees include: mechanical engineering student Alec Fixl (cross country and track and field); engineering student Nicholas Nguyen (golf); architecture student Andrew Sauers (soccer); physician assistant studies student Ethan Fadale (track and field); accounting student Rachel Day (basketball); community and trauma counseling student Kelsey Jones (basketball); animation student Maddie Conway (cross country and track and field); and physician assistant studies student Katy Sullivan (softball).

In order to be named to a CACC All-Academic Team, recipients must have participated in a CACC-sponsored championship sport; be at least a sophomore academically and athletically; been a student-athlete playing a CACC-sponsored sport at their current school for at least two semesters; and achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher through the preceding semester.

Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association Scholar-Athletes must have met all eligibility rules as defined by their institution; be in their second, third or fourth year of eligibility; have rowed in their institution’s NCAA or IRA eligible boat(s) for a minimum of 75 percent of the current spring races or racing in a regional conference event; and have a 3.50 cumulative GPA or higher for their career (through the fall semester/quarter for the current competition year).

Kaijie Chen developed the design, “Unusual Beauty,” as part of an MSSI course.

Kaijie Chen developed the design, “Unusual Beauty,” as part of an MSSI course.

A design created by M.S. in surface imaging alumna Kaijie Chen ’16 upholstered on Steelcase’s new Silq chair won a Best of NeoCon Innovation Award this year at NeoCon.

Chen developed the design, “Unusual Beauty,” in summer 2015 as part of an MSSI course and licensed it to Designtex (a part of Steelcase) through its Bespoke program.

Steelcase showcased the chair with Chen’s design on the company’s Instagram page.

The policy of separating children from their parents at the U.S. border can produce “toxic levels of stress in childhood [that] can compromise brain development and it can lead to long-term negative psychological and physical outcomes for kids,” Jeanne Felter, PhD, director of Jefferson’s Community and Trauma Counseling Program, said in interviews this week with NBC10 and KYW Newsradio.

“This is no way a positive thing for children,” Felter said.

Industrial design student Tyler Miller designed this microwave prototype for the elderly.

Industrial design student Tyler Miller designed this microwave prototype for the elderly. (Click to enlarge.)

A new program at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University), Designing for Accessibility, taps into the imaginations of industrial design and occupational therapy faculty and students to develop assistive devices to help others in need.

The program connects East Falls industrial design students with occupational therapy faculty and students at the Center City campus, who provide feedback on the viability of students’ concepts based on the clinicians’ knowledge and experience with patients. One example of many collaborations is a microwave prototype designed for the elderly. It has a removable, washable insert, simplified controls, a display with large numbers and a cook-time limit of six minutes to prevent overcooking and fires.

Designing for Accessibility provides students with real-world feedback on concepts that promise to improve the lives of those needing help in accomplishing everyday tasks.

Disaster medicine and management student Suraksha Chandrasekhar enrolled at Jefferson to pursue a career in international humanitarian aid.

Disaster Medicine and Management student Suraksha Chandrasekhar enrolled at Jefferson to pursue a career in international humanitarian aid.

TheBestSchools.org has named the University’s M.S. in Disaster Medicine and Management program the No. 2 online master’s in emergency management degree program in the nation. The organization based the rankings on program quality and range of courses provided, as well as school awards, reputation and other rankings.

The Disaster Medicine and Management program features two learning formats—online and on-campus. Both tracks require an intensive week of working in the field where students participate in disaster drills and refine their knowledge, skills and abilities.

“Requiring real-world experience woven into the curriculum provides opportunities to see theory and practice come together,” said Jean Bail, director of the Disaster Medicine and Management program at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University). “Our capstones also allow students to identify a community or organizational need and create projects to fill these gaps.”

Disaster Medicine and Management student Suraksha Chandrasekhar enrolled at Jefferson to pursue a career in international humanitarian aid.

“This program threw me into the real world, where I got the opportunity to engage in and find solutions to pressing issues within the realm of disasters and humanitarian crisis management,” she said. “Throughout the program, we’re given a platform to develop tools and skillsets required to identify root causes, find innovative solutions and fine-tune our decision-making skills, so that when the time comes, we’re well-equipped to alleviate suffering and minimize damages imposed by disasters and humanitarian emergencies.”

Read the full rankings from TheBestSchools.org here.

The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing is expected to train up to 2,500 professionals annually at its newly announced site at Spring House Innovation Park, Technical.ly Philly reported June 15, noting the biopharma hub will open spring 2019.

Jefferson faculty members Mark Sunderland and Hitoshi Ujiie discuss how the latest technology in digital fabric printing can impact the fashion and textiles industries, Impressions Magazine reported June 11.

Sunderland is the Robert J. Reichlin High-Performance Apparel Chair and director of the global fashion enterprise and textile materials technology programs. Ujiie is director of Jefferson’s Center for Excellence in Surface Imaging.

 

Interior design alumna Ghislaine Vinas’s flair for color and narrative has made her firm a growing force in workplace and product design, Metropolis reported June 15.

“Ghislaine Viñas Interior Design, her ten-person firm, is having quite a year. At ICFF in May, it launched a rug collection with Aronson. This month, the firm will unveil two major projects at NeoCon: the new Scandinavian Spaces showroom in Chicago’s Mart and Viñas’s first textile foray, a collaboration with HBF Textiles,” Metropolis wrote. Vinas graduated in 1991.

The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing will open spring 2019 at Spring House Innovation Park, The Philadelphia Business Journal reported June 14.

“Our facility at Spring House Innovation Park will utilize leading-edge biopharmaceutical manufacturing technology and support current and future workforce demands in this critically important field,” Ron Kander, PhD, dean of the Kanbar College of Design, Engineering and Commerce, said.

“The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing is an outstanding example of the academic possibilities created by the merger of Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University,” said Kathleen Gallagher, the university’s executive vice president and chief operating officer. “Our strategic plan recognizes the value of partnerships, such as the one with NIBRT, as foundational in developing programs that enable our students to be successful professionals.”

The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing, which will provide state-of-the-art education and training in the fast-emerging field of biopharmaceutical processing, will open spring 2019 at the Spring House Innovation Park in Lower Gwynedd, Pa.

The 25,000-square-foot facility will house programs to educate and train about 2,500 people annually to produce these potentially life-saving drugs, including biopharmaceutical professionals and bioprocessing engineering students, and provide workforce training and certifications through regional educational partnerships.

A rending of the Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing at Spring House Innovation Park.

A rendering of the Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing at Spring House Innovation Park.

The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing is the first—and only—education and training institute for biopharmaceutical processing in North America to be established in partnership with the internationally recognized National Institute for Bioprocessing Research and Training (NIBRT), which is based in Dublin, Ireland.

“The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing demonstrates the vision and mission of Jefferson by leveraging partnerships with industry, academia and government agencies to provide globally recognized, transdisciplinary education and training in this fast-emerging field,” said Ron Kander, PhD, dean of Kanbar College of Design, Engineering and Commerce and associate provost for applied research at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University).  “Our facility at Spring House Innovation Park will utilize leading-edge biopharmaceutical manufacturing technology and support current and future workforce demands in this critically important field.”

Spring House Innovation Park is a 133-acre multi-use campus including office, laboratory and research and development space. The centrally located facility is near the region’s pharmaceutical industry and part of the BioLaunch611+ Keystone Innovation Zone, with easy access to Jefferson campuses, Center City, the Philadelphia Airport, 30th Street Station and the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

“The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing is an outstanding example of the academic possibilities created by the merger of Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University,” said Kathleen Gallagher, the University’s executive vice president and chief operating officer. “Our Strategic Plan recognizes the value of partnerships, such as the one with NIBRT, as foundational in developing programs that enable our students to be successful professionals.  The Spring House Innovation Park will not only provide a top-tier facility, but will further advantage our students and trainees by providing a larger community of innovators in other forward-thinking industries.”

Biologics, with new therapies that can turn acute and debilitating illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes and cancer into manageable chronic diseases and sometimes cures, are rapidly gaining momentum throughout the world. Yet, because of the complex manufacturing process and lengthier regulatory approval process compared to traditional small-molecule drugs, biologics remain challenging to produce, with only a handful of centers throughout the world dedicated to training people to produce these potentially life-saving drugs. The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing will close that gap.

Internationally recognized for its excellence in bioprocessing research and training, NIBRT serves about 4,000 industry professionals worldwide at its Dublin headquarters, including many from the United States. The Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing will leverage the renowned NIBRT curriculum to provide a premier U.S.-based option with a significant potential market that includes 900-plus pharmaceutical-related companies in the Northeast U.S. The Institute will utilize the latest single-use engineering technology pioneered by General Electric.

When fully operational, the Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing is expected to serve 2,500 people annually, including programs for pharmaceutical professionals, workforce training through community college partnerships and bioprocessing certifications through regional university partnerships. Importantly, the Institute will facilitate enrollment of 70 additional Jefferson students in bioprocessing engineering at the undergraduate through PhD levels.

Biologic pharmaceuticals are manufactured in a living system such as a microorganism, plant or animal cell, often utilizing recombinant DNA technology. The development of biologic pharmaceuticals is growing rapidly, representing a major shift in the industry from traditional chemical synthesis techniques. More than 40 percent of therapeutics currently in research and development are biopharmaceuticals.