16 Rams Named to CACC Soccer All-Academic Teams

Thirteen members of the women's soccer team earned the distinction from CACC.

Thirteen members of the women’s soccer team earned the distinction from CACC.

Thirteen members of the women’s soccer team were named to the 2017 CACC Women’s Soccer All-Academic Team—the most in the conference. In addition, three members of the men’s soccer team were named to the 2017 CACC Men’s Soccer All-Academic Team.

For the women’s team, the honorees include: Emily Discavage, Jada Fields, Morgan Foster, Hanna Glass, Brooke Haden, Amy Heller, Jessica Monteleone, Katie Neveil, Dena Noiseux, Tessa Nykanen, Erin Sullivan, Erin Tinneny and Kayla West. Dermot Hughes, Rashaan Robe and Andrew Sauers earned the distinction on the men’s squad.

To be named to a CACC All-Academic Team, recipients must have participated in a CACC-sponsored championship sport, be at least a sophomore academically and athletically, been a student-athlete at their current school for at least two semesters, and achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher through the preceding semester.

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Jefferson ID Impresses at The 2017 Collab Design Competition

From Left to Right: Hannah Smythe (Clover Stool), Jessica Monteleone (ParaStorage Stool), Peter Holderith (The Sock Stool), Zachary Samalonis (ReadnRock).

From Left to Right: Hannah Smythe (Clover Stool), Jessica Monteleone (ParaStorage Stool), Peter Holderith (The Sock Stool), Zachary Samalonis (ReadnRock).

“After months of work, four sophomore industrial design students were called out for awards.

By Zach Samalonis

For the past few months, students from the Design 3 Studio have been hard at work, preparing for the 2017 COLLAB Student Design Competition held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. This annual event provides a unique opportunity for regional university design students to experience competition outside the classroom and to receive valuable feedback from nationally recognized industry leaders. Each year’s competition is thematically linked to the work of the annual Collab Design Excellence Award honoree, a world-class individual recognized as having made significant contributions to the field of design. This year’s Collab Design Excellence Award honoree and inspiration for the competition was Spanish architect and designer Patricia Urquiola. Students were tasked with “Designing a piece of furniture that is the focal point of a room and incorporates storage. Urquiola’s work touches on artistry, craft, technology, culture, and a nod to the “hand.” Student submissions must speak to Urqioula’s influence and must be reproducible.” By integrating the competition into the Design 3 curriculum, students were pushed to create both a full-scale model, as well as a scale model for the competition.

The hard work paid off with four of our sophomore industrial design students were called out for awards and design excellence at the 2017 Collab Design Competition. Students were up against other designers from Drexel University, UArts, UPenn, Parsons, and RIT.

Peter Holderith’s Second Place-winning “Sock Stool”.

Peter Holderith’s Second Place-winning “Sock Stool”.

Peter Holderith took 2nd place in the competition, with his entry titled “The Sock Stool”. Juror Matt Tyson said of second place prize winner “Everyone looking at this stool was surprised…it was this instant feeling of joy, as none of us would have ever thought of this before! It was an interesting take on the display of a piece of clothing. It also gave the opportunity to all the textile designers of the world to show off their creations, taking something that is typically hidden and showing it off…A really fun piece! I particularly like the repetition in the design, so the repeat of manufactured parts saves costs which is really smart.”

Three other students, Jessica Monteleone, Zachary Samalonis and Hannah Smythe were recognized for design excellence, and were called out individually by the different jurors. Each of the jurors appreciated the attention to detail and craft of the stools, as well as the inspiration drawn from Patricia’s work.

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A Night Full of Conversations

Tom Dooley from Bresslergroup begins his presentation.

Tom Dooley from Bresslergroup addresses the students.

“The 2017 Industrial Design Speaker Series Wraps up with a Panel Discussion and Portfolio Review”

By Zach Samalonis

Last week in the Jefferson ID Department, students learned what employers look for in design portfolios. The discussion panel featured professionals and alumni from Bresslergroup, DESIGNLYNX, TerraCycle and Shea + Latone, making an excellent close to the 2017 Industrial Design Speaker Series. Students packed the Tuttleman Center and participated in both group discussions as well as one-on-one conversations to receive feedback on their portfolios.

Jefferson alum Tom Dooley from Bresslergroup was able to give students an idea what it’s like to work in an environment surrounded by other professionals in different fields. He explained that at Bresslergroup “industrial designers must be well versed in their skillset and must be able to work with other disciplines, such as electrical and mechanical engineers.” Tom also was able to shed some insight on what it’s like working for a larger agency and how the company is always changing.

Jefferson alum Brian Orme of DESIGNLYNX showed students the other end of the spectrum and exposed them to life at a smaller agency. He was able to contrast against Bresslergroup and show how even though the two companies are different in size, they both look for similar things in portfolios. Brian answered questions about how to stand out and the importance of learning other skills (outside of the classroom) and using them in the work that students do.

Kelsey Moffitt discussed her work at TerraCycle and was able to connect with students as she has only been in the field for a little over a year. Kelsey explained to students that at TerraCycle prototyping is part of their everyday work and how each day the work is different. Kelsey’s stories about her experience at TerraCycle allowed students to see the difficulties of applying for positions, but how positive experiences can come from a little hardship.

Jeff Theesfeld and Shaun Smith (both Jefferson alums) were able to shed some light on their journey at Shea + Latone and how the two of them became partners and ended up taking over the busisness after their bosses were ready to retire. Throughout Shea + Latone’s presentation, the importance of craft and putting yourself out in front of the world was stressed. Both Jeff and Shaun felt that as students create their portfolios, they should consider their audience and “present your truest self”, even if this meant that you had flaws. “Every designer isn’t going to know everything” says Jeff “but, it’s important to present your best self and remember the little things… There is a lot of low hanging fruit that can impress employers that many designers forget about”. Jeff and Shaun ended their presentation stressing the importance of networking and gave anecdotes about how networking helped them land their first positions at Shea + Latone.

The night ended with an extensive question and answer period, along with a breakout session that allowed Jefferson students to network and have their own portfolios reviewed and critiqued. The 2017 Fall Industrial Design Alumni Speaker Series was a huge success and the department hopes to continue with another Series in Spring 2018 in continued celebration of the 20th anniversary of the department.

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The Future is Printed

Hewlett-Packard's Jet Fusion printers and an example of Nike's 3D-printed shoe sole.

Hewlett-Packard’s Jet Fusion printers and an example of Nike’s 3D-printed shoe sole.

“Rapid Manufacturing was the subject of the second talk in our 2017 Fall Industrial Design Speaker Series.”

By Zach Samalonis

The second talk in this year’s “20th Anniversary Fall Industrial Design Speaker Series”  featured a panel discussion with professionals from Stratasys, ProtoCAM and CIMquest.

The discussion focused on how designers are no longer limited to using 3D printing as a prototyping tool. 3D Printing is emerging as a viable source for manufacturing of an ever-widening range of parts and assemblies. Stratasys opened the discussion, by sharing with students how industrial designers at General Electric were able to create a new aerospace fueling nozzle out of a single part, one that once was comprised of 20 individual parts. The story drove the conversation in the direction of new printers and the wide range of possibilities they provide. New printers, such as the HP Jet Fusion, are shaking up the field, with quicker print times and higher quality prints. “Printing at this scale also allows for mass customization. Once you have the power, you can see the benefits” stated professor Eric Schneider who led the panel discussion.

General Electric's one piece 3D-printed fueling nozzle. Originally it was comprised of over 20 separate pieces.

General Electric’s one piece 3D-printed fueling nozzle. The previous generation was composed of over 20 separate pieces.

Great emphasis was placed on the fact that in just a few short years, designer won’t be limited to injection molding as the only way to manufacture on a large scale. Some designs, that were previously limited due to technical details such as draft angle, will soon be possible to print for the mass market. In fact, ProtoCAM mentioned that they are already printing hundreds of custom parts a week, showing that the future is already beginning to happen.

The discussion ended with time for students to ask questions and come down to the floor and see parts that had been printed using the methods discussed. Students had the opportunity to see first-hand how 3D printing is becoming something that will play a large role in their professional practices.

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Chancellor Spinelli Discusses Leading Through Change: The Philadelphia Inquirer

Chancellor Stephen Spinelli Jr. talks about leading Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) through the recent merger to deliver better education and thrive in an environment that is challenging to higher education, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported Nov. 21.

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Street Medicine Movement Leader Dr. Jim Withers to Speak at Jefferson on Nov. 27

Jim Withers created the Street Medicine Institute in 2009.

Dr. Jim Withers created the Street Medicine Institute in 2009.

Dr. Jim Withers, a leader in providing medical care for the homeless and founder of the Street Medicine Institute, will present the annual Dietrich V. Asten Lecture at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) on Monday, Nov. 27, at 5:30 p.m.

Withers, assistant clinical professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, will discuss his work and the evolution of the street medicine movement, including how it fills gaps in care and improves cost savings and effectiveness.

His interest in service-oriented medicine grew through medical service trips to Central America and India.

In 1992, Withers dressed as a homeless person and made “house calls” at night to people living on the streets of Pittsburgh. This led to the founding of Operation Safety Net, one of the first full-time, comprehensive medical services of its kind for the unsheltered homeless.

Withers established the International Street Medicine Symposium in 2005 to foster collaboration in the care of those sleeping on the streets and, four years later, he created the Street Medicine Institute to focus on helping communities establish street medicine programs, improve existing practices and create a student fellowship in street medicine.

In addition to his work to provide health care for the homeless, Withers also has special interests in domestic violence and international medicine. Read the CNN story on his work here.

The Dietrich V. Asten Lecture at Jefferson is supported by an endowment for lectures in the humanities, sciences, arts and government that enrich the educational experience of students in the University’s professional majors.

The lecture, “Go to the People,” will be presented Monday, Nov. 27, at 5:30 p.m. in the Kanbar Campus Center Performance Space on Jefferson’s East Falls Campus. The lecture is free and open to the public. RSVP to provost@philau.edu.

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Accounting Professor James Solano to Receive Dick Vermeil Award

James Solano has worked at the University since 1976.

James Solano has worked at the University since 1976.

Associate professor of accounting James Solano will receive the Dick Vermeil Award at the Night with the Stars benefit in Philadelphia on Dec. 5. To be presented by the famous NFL coach, the honor signifies the recipient’s dedication to family, team and community.

Proceeds from the event benefit Michael’s Way, whose mission is to improve the lives of children with cancer and to support their parents struggling under the financial strain.

“I am very proud and humbled to receive this award,” said Solano, who has a distinguished 48-year career in the Philadelphia area.

He has worked at the University since 1976, teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in accounting and taxation.

Solano also has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Fox School of Business at Temple University and the inaugural Outstanding Educator award from the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants. In addition, his sports agency business included about 800 players and coaches over his career, and he founded the Otho Davis Foundation and the Jerome Brown Foundation to raise funds for academic scholarships and for underprivileged children.

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Special Fashion Design and College of Architecture and the Built Environment Visit Days

admissions-defaultSpecial Fashion Design and College of Architecture and the Built Environment Visit Days

Are you interested in studying Fashion Design or one of the majors within the College of Architecture and the Built Environment (Architecture, Architectural Studies, Construction Management, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture)? If so, join us for a specialized visit.

Sample schedule:

9:30-10:30 – tour of campus
10:30-11:00 – Admissions presentation
11:00-11:30 – Academic presentation
11:30-12:00 – visit to studios
12:00-1:00 – Lunch

Register now for the College of Architecture and the Built Environment Visit on Wednesday, November 29

Register now for the Fashion Design Visit on Thursday, November 30

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Fifth Class Graduates from Jefferson’s Academy of Municipal Innovation

For the last seven weeks, a group of 20 city employees took classes at Jefferson to help them foster an environment of innovation in area government.

For the last seven weeks, a group of 20 city employees took classes at Jefferson to help them foster an environment of innovation in area government.

The fifth class of the Academy for Municipal Innovation (AMI), a unique collaboration between Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) and the city of Philadelphia designed to help city workers innovate in their jobs, graduated Nov. 14.

“This is a groundbreaking program,” said D.R. Widder, Jefferson’s vice president of innovation and Steve Blank Innovation Chair. “Government is a difficult area for innovation, but this program with the city is having real impact. It’s amazing that we now have nearly 100 city leaders applying Jefferson innovation principles to make Philadelphia better.”

For the last seven weeks, a group of 20 city employees took classes at Jefferson to help them foster an environment of innovation in area government. Coming from diverse areas such as Philly311, the Department of Licenses and Inspections, the Fire Department, and the Department of Commerce, participants learned to integrate tools and techniques of innovation drawn from design thinking, system thinking, business analytics and ethnographic research to discover solutions to complex real-world problems.

The program was delivered in a studio setting, anchored in Jefferson’s signature Nexus Learning pedagogy of active, collaborative and real-world learning, Widder said. Each session introduced practical techniques and tools that can be immediately applied at work to inspire innovation through collaboration. The program is designed to apply the innovation best practices from industry in a government setting.

As a result of AMI, graduate Monique Nesmith-Joyner hopes to implement electronic payment capabilities in the Department of Records.

As a result of AMI, graduate Monique Nesmith-Joyner hopes to implement electronic payment capabilities in the Department of Records.

“AMI is a wonderful opportunity for municipal employees to think outside the box as they strive to improve services,” said recent program graduate Ava Ashley, manager of the trauma transformation unit in the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services. “The Academy’s approach to introducing design thinking with a cross-section of municipal services allows one to hear the complexity of how various departments must address issues.”

New graduate Monique Nesmith-Joyner, deputy commissioner of the Department of Records, also found the experience rewarding and already started work on a project as a result.

“Currently, Department of Records’ units don’t accept electronic payment,” she said. “Through conversations during the AMI, I’ve made a connection with the key staff that oversee electronic payment initiatives for the city and plan to begin the exploration of electronic payment for all of the Records’ units. I’m hopeful that in a relatively short timeframe, we will have electronic payment capabilities throughout the department, creating an effective process for citizens and an efficient process for the Department of Records.”

Each class focused on a specific innovation-centric topic, including discovering opportunities through design thinking; analyzing complexities through systems thinking; developing value propositions through business analytics; and understanding end users through research. All courses were taught by Jefferson faculty members from a range of disciplines, including biology, marketing, and business and strategic leadership.

“We’re particularly excited about this fifth cohort of the Academy because we’ve really solidified the connection between this program and our larger innovation portfolio,” said Eliza Pollack, senior program manager for innovation management in the Office of Innovation of Technology, which coordinates AMI on the city government side. “Our new initiative, Innovation Consulting, connects graduates of the AMI program with other departments in the city looking to solve problems in new ways. We feel this class will truly be able to help us—and their teams—leverage what they’ve learned to grow the innovation network.”

On Monday, Dec. 4, Jefferson will host its inaugural Government Innovation Expo with alumni from all five AMI classes. They will share their experiences in the program and how they’ve used innovation principles in their jobs. Jefferson faculty and city government leaders will speak as well.

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Volleyball Faces Georgian Court in the CACC Semifinals on Saturday

The Rams look to defend their 2016 CACC Championship this weekend.

The Rams look to defend their 2016 CACC Championship this weekend.

The Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) volleyball team will play the Georgian Court Lions in the CACC Semifinals on Saturday, Nov. 18, in New Castle, Del., at the Wilmington University-hosted 2017 CACC Tournament. Action begins at 1 p.m.

The Rams swept the Bloomfield Bears in the conference quarterfinals on Tuesday night by a 25-17, 25-19, 25-10 final. It comes as the squad’s 14th-straight victory and ninth consecutive sweep. All-CACC First Team honoree Corinne Justus led the Rams to the midweek win with a .524 hitting percentage behind 12 kills. The No. 1 seed in the CACC South Division, Jefferson is now 25-6.

The winner of Jefferson/Georgian Court will meet the winner of No. 1 North seeded Caldwell/No. 2 South seeded Holy Family in the CACC Championship on Sunday, Nov. 19, at noon in New Castle. The Rams are looking to defend their 2016 CACC Championship.

Third-year head coach Tim Moyer was recently named the 2017 CACC Volleyball Coach of the Year.

Read more about this weekend’s game.

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