Population Health Dean Reports on Risk-Based Payments: Becker’s Hospital Review, Fierce Healthcare

Jefferson College of Population Health Dean David Nash collaborated with Numerof & Associates on a new survey that examines how fast healthcare is adopting population health strategies and moving toward value-based care, reported Becker’s Hospital Review and Fierce Healthcare.

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Population Health Professor Addresses Gun Violence and Communities: Philadelphia Inquirer

Drew Harris, assistant professor in the Jefferson College of Population Health, addressed the complex issues, particularly in poor, urban communities, that can impact gun violence in a commentary in The Philadelphia Inquirer April 13.

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Jefferson Students Showcase Artwork Illustrating Dreams and Ambitions

"My Grandpa's Hands" by doctorate in occupational therapy student Sarah Weinblatt will be on display.

“My Grandpa’s Hands” by doctorate in occupational therapy student Sarah Weinblatt will be on display.

As part of Jefferson’s Humanities Week, all students, faculty and staff are invited to stop by the “Who Are We?” art exhibition, which will be on view Wednesday, April 25 through Friday, April 27 in the Hamilton Building lobby on the Center City Campus.

The exhibit will feature artwork by 14 Jefferson students illustrating their passions, dreams and ambitions as part of the University’s continued commitment to encourage student engagement in the arts and humanities in recognition of their capacity to foster essential skills related to healthcare, including observation, critical thinking, self-reflection and empathy.

On Thursday, April 26, the Jefferson community is welcome to commemorate the artists with refreshments at “Celebration of the Humanities.”

Featured at the event will be contributors to Jefferson’s annual literary and arts journal, Inside Out, as well as the inaugural recipients of the Asano Humanities and Health Certificate–a co-curricular program that rewards sustained engagement in arts and humanities activities throughout the academic year.

Event Overview:

“Who Are We?” Art Exhibition
Wednesday, April 25 – Friday, April 27
Conrady Lobby, Hamilton Building

Celebration of the Humanities
Thursday, April 26
6-7:30 p.m.
Conrady Lobby, Hamilton Building

Both events are free, and no registration is needed. For more info, email Rebecca.E.Harris@jefferson.edu. Learn more about Jefferson’s Humanities and Health programs here.

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“A Walk Through … Reflection for Progress” Exhibit Opens April 20

Physician assistant studies student Claire Domogala contributed this photo to the exhibit.

Physician assistant studies student Claire Domogala contributed this photo to the exhibit.

The Honors Student Association and Student Government Association are collaborating on “A Walk Through … Reflection for Progress,” an exhibit comprised of work that showcases what Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) means to the community and what the two Universities have gained since the July 2017 merger.

The event will feature approximately 130 quotes, collages, photographs, drawings, silent films, animations, graphics, videos and poems. “A Walk Through … Reflection for Progress” will debut on Friday, April 20, in the Kanbar Campus Center for an opening reception for administrators, faculty and exhibit contributors. The gallery will remain on display in Kanbar for the following week.

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Jefferson Medical Student Awarded Jackson/Minton Scholarship: Philadelphia Tribune

Sidney Kimmel Medical College student Peter Salam Beah was awarded the 2018 Jackson/Minton Scholarship, The Philadelphia Tribune reported March 30.

The scholarship is endowed by Sigma Pi Phi members and Jefferson alumni Dr. Algernon Brashear Jackson and Dr. Henry McKee Minton.

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Jefferson Hosts Systems Thinking Workshop on Community Violence

High school girls from several area public and charter high schools visited East Falls Campus.

High school students from several area public and charter high schools visited East Falls Campus.

Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) recently hosted a systems thinking workshop on the topic of community violence. Eight minority high school girls from several public and charter high schools in the Philadelphia area visited East Falls Campus on March 24.

Each high school student paired up with a female undergraduate from Jefferson who has taken the DECSYS systems thinking course, said Radika Bhaskar, teaching assistant professor and coordinator of the systems thinking course at Jefferson, who organized the event with We.REIGN founder Tawanna Jones-Morrison.

“We had an overview of the topic of community violence, what systems it impacts—focusing on schools, families and neighborhoods—and its significance in the lives of brown and black girls,” Bhaskar said.

The high school and Jefferson students formed small teams and created systems models, and at the end of the session, Ronald Kander, dean of the Kanbar College of Design, Engineering and Commerce, led the group through an exercise on differentiating the root cause from the symptom of a problem and how to craft a problem statement.

With the success of this first program, Jefferson plans to offer another workshop in the fall, Bhaskar said.

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Interior Design Senior Wins IDA Awards Competition

Monica Tabet won for Phoenix Rising, a museum dedicated to feminism and domestic violence.

Monica Tabet won for Phoenix Rising, a museum dedicated to feminism and domestic violence.

Interior design student Monica Tabet ’18 earned first place in the 2018 IDA Awards Competition (Student Category) hosted by the Pennsylvania East Chapter of American Society of Interior Designers. She won for Phoenix Rising, a museum dedicated to feminism and domestic violence.

“The idea of the museum is to raise awareness and empathy for people suffering from abuse,” she said. “The ultimate purpose is empowerment, inspiring strength and confidence by portraying the transformation from victim to warrior.”

The user moves through a jagged path of galleries depicting false perceptions of female weakness contributing to the horrors of abuse. At the center, the story concludes by “rising” from the darkness to the empowerment gallery.

“It means a lot to have my work honored by the interior design community, and coming this close to graduation, it also gives me a strong sense of purpose,” Tabet said. “Going forward, I want to keep being worthy of that honor by pushing myself to higher standards of excellence as a professional, something that Jefferson and the program at CABE have definitely prepared me to do.”

Last year, Tabet was part of a student team that won the Interior Design Educators Council East Region Student Design Competition.

Jefferson’s B.S. in interior design program was recently ranked 20th in the country by DesignIntelligence. In addition, the company named Lisa Phillips, assistant professor of interior design at Jefferson, one of the 25 most admired educators for 2017-2018.

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Design Thinking Workshop Led by IBM Strategist

Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) hosted a design thinking workshop on April 5 for East Falls and Center City faculty. At the event, facilitated by Amber Atkins, lead design strategist at IBM Design for Services, attendees participated in a series of activities and learned methodologies to improve their professional and educational practice. Faculty members came from various programs across both campuses, including Occupational Therapy, Graphic Design Communication, Population Health, Landscape Architecture and Engineering. “This workshop was a great opportunity for faculty to learn about different approaches for problem framing, research and ideation across disciplines,” said Maribeth Kradel-Weitzel, Associate Professor of Graphic Design Communication, who organized the event.

 

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First Cohort of Doctor of Management in Strategic Leadership Students to Graduate

Adena Johnston will be among the first students to graduate from Jefferson's Doctor of Management in Strategic Leadership program.

Adena Johnston will be among the first students to graduate from Jefferson’s Doctor of Management in Strategic Leadership program.

The Doctor of Management in Strategic Leadership (DSL) program at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University), designed by more than 120 stakeholders from academia and professional practice in 2014, will graduate its first cohort of students this May.

“It’s a testimony to the innovative program design, remarkable support by the elite DSL faculty, and the high quality and discipline of the scholar-practitioner students,” said program director Larry Starr. “DSL has both reimagined and re-enabled working professionals to earn this Jefferson professional executive leadership doctorate.”

“This is an important milestone for this innovative and prestigious program that has pioneered Nexus Learning and leadership at the doctorate level,” added D.R. Widder, the University’s vice president of innovation and Steve Blank Innovation Chair.

The DSL program enhances students’ capacities and competencies by helping them to recognize new strategic thinking frameworks, methods and tools across organizational domains for operating in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous contexts, he said, anticipating seven students from the program to walk at Commencement on May 9.

Adena Johnston will be one of them having passed her doctoral defense by unanimous agreement.

“Being the first cohort of a program is an opportunity to blaze the trail for others,” Johnston shared.

She enrolled at Jefferson because she wanted a program that focused on cutting-edge issues facing today’s businesses and supported her working full time.

As vice president and practice leader for CCI Consulting’s Talent Development Practice, Johnston looks forward to expanding her practice to integrate systems and design thinking to help clients adapt and ready themselves to navigate intense workforce challenges. She also plans to write a book for leaders of the fourth Industrial Revolution who want to ensure their organizations remain resilient and achieve a competitive advantage.

Recently ranked No. 22 in the Top 50 Business Management Doctorate programs in the United States by Top Management Degrees, Jefferson excels by providing students with individual and group coaching in leadership development, communication and presentation skills, research topic development and academic writing, Starr said. The program also contracts with clients seeking help with challenging, complex projects, creating a professional consultancy led and shared by faculty and students across courses and semesters.

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In Unique Collaboration, Occupational Therapy and Industrial Design Students Help Clients with Special Needs

OT student Halie Finke and ID student Jason Depenbrock created a new assistive device that will allow their client to use his communication device while lying down or sitting in different positions.

OT student Halie Finke and ID student Jason Depenbrock created a new assistive device that will allow their client to use his communication device while lying down or sitting in different positions.

In the oldest continuously running transdisciplinary collaboration on East Falls Campus, the 18th annual Assistive Technology Collaboration presentation on April 6 paired dozens of occupational therapy and industrial design students together to show their innovative designs to help clients with special needs.

Working for client educators, the teams of first-year M.S. in occupational therapy students and third-year B.S. in industrial design students identified areas of need, found spots where adaptive and assistive devices can make everyday tasks easier, and created proposals for new devices that will help.

“The OT-ID project represents the type of unique collaboration that you find on our campus,” said Michael Leonard, dean of the School of Design and Engineering in the Kanbar College of Design, Engineering and Commerce, and the David and Lillian Rea Chair of Design and Engineering at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University).

Monique Chabot, assistant professor of occupational therapy, said her students benefit tremendously by working closely with the industrial design students and seeing the impact a well-designed device can have on someone’s life.

Julia Norkitis and Gaige DeHaven designed and built an ergonomically friendly cuff that allowed their client with poor hand strength to remove and put on a compression sleeve independently.

Julia Norkitis and Gaige DeHaven designed and built an ergonomically friendly cuff that allows their client with poor hand strength to remove and put on a compression sleeve independently.

“I also know that the client educators are thrilled every year to be a part of this project and to support the students’ learning on both sides,” she said.

In the Kanbar Performance Space, dozens of projects were display, including a chair that reacts and responds to the motions of a seizure to prevent the client from hurting herself, a passive, non-electromechanical device for hands-free door opening and a novel electronic controller system which uses the rear of the head against a surface to actuate.

Occupational therapy student Julia Norkitis and industrial design student Gaige DeHaven paired up with a client who has lymphedema (significant swelling) in her left arm. They designed and built an ergonomically friendly cuff that allowed their client with poor hand strength to remove and put on a compression sleeve independently.

“My partner’s knowledge about the pros and cons of using different materials complemented my knowledge of the kinematics of the human body,” said Norkitis, noting they came up with at least 50 different ideas for the one prototype. “Gaige thought of what types of clips would hold on to the compression sleeve fabric while I considered which clip materials would be most gentle on stretched skin. Instead of focusing on our own specialties, we taught each other along the way so we both have an understanding of industrial design and occupational therapy concepts. This type of collaboration allowed us to finish the semester as creators of a great prototype, but also as more well-rounded professionals.”

DeHaven, too, said he learned a great deal about occupational therapy and kinematics of the human body from Norkitis.

Julia Thiel and Zachary Quain created an infant seat for a 94-year-old patient with minimal upper limb strength to cuddle with her great-granddaughter.

Julia Thiel and Zachary Quain created an infant seat for a 94-year-old patient with minimal upper limb strength to cuddle with her great-granddaughter.

“Aside from the medical knowledge, I gained new insights in design by working with a new thermoplastic used for splints,” he said. “Similar to an OT, I learned how to take different parts from other products to build a functioning prototype. I’m excited to know that our adjustable sleeve assist will help our client be more independent in her daily life. This project allowed me to develop a personal relationship with my client by creating a custom product for her specific needs.”

Industrial design student Sean Cassidy also said helping a real person and not just dealing with a hypothetical situation made the project particularly beneficial. “She was someone I could connect with,” he said.

Cassidy partnered with occupational therapy student Jaclyn Bonner to work with a client with a rare genetic disorder, which caused impairments in her mental and motor skills and sight. In addition, she can’t communicate verbally. They created an assistive device that will enable her to communicate via an assistive touch application on an iPad.

During the project, Bonner said she improved her consultation and collaborative abilities when discussing the client’s needs with her mother, as well as strengthened her inter-professional and communication skills.

“Throughout this process, I learned that OT and ID have similar values—each wants to benefit the client’s quality of life,” she said. “This common value was the core that my ID partner and I used when developing the product for our client. When discussing different routes and possibilities, we frequently went back to the questions, ‘What is functional for our client?’ and ‘What will allow her to participate fully in social participation?’ which is the occupation she values the most.”

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