Jefferson Fashion Ranked One of the Top Programs Internationally by CEOWORLD Magazine

The publication ranked Jefferson No. 24 internationally and No. 6 in the United States.

The publication ranked Jefferson’s fashion program No. 24 in the world and No. 6 in the United States. Alana McHugh’s collection, pictured here, won the Nexus Learning Award at the 2018 Fashion Show.

Adding to its global recognitions, Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) continues to climb the rankings in the latest list of Best Fashion Schools in the World by CEOWORLD Magazine.

The publication ranked Jefferson No. 24 internationally, a jump of four spots compared to 2017, and No. 6 in the United States, a leap of two spots.

The ranking takes into account global reputation and influence, specialization, recruiters’ feedback, placement rates, admission eligibility and academic experience. CEOWORLD developed the rankings using rigorous analytics and incorporating multiple data sources. The publication collected detailed surveys and information from 35,000 students, 30,000 industry professionals and 20,000 recruiters from 42 countries.

“Our industry-focused approach to fashion education has garnered international recognition and sets us apart from the competition,” said Sheila Connelly, director of the fashion design program at Jefferson. “So many schools get stuck in a rut, but we’re consistently evaluating our curriculum and adjusting to meet fast-paced industry demands. As a fashion school, it is so important to keep moving forward. This ranking is again validation that we’re on the right path.”

Further showing the University’s international reputation in the fashion industry, Jefferson fashion programs have been named among the top 25 programs in the world, according to the influential fashion website Fashionista. This ranking came on the heels of the Fashionista report that placed Jefferson fashion programs among the top 10 in the United States.

Also last fall, Business of Fashion ranked Jefferson fashion programs, including undergraduate and graduate fashion design and textile design, fashion merchandising and management and global fashion enterprise, among the top programs in the world.

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SKMC Graduate Says ‘Imposter Syndrome’ Can Help Make Better Doctors: Philadelphia Inquirer

Sidney Kimmel Medical College graduate Michael Natter, MD, says the right dose of “imposter syndrome” can help keep doctors grounded and ultimately  make them better doctors, he wrote in a commentary in The Philadelphia Inquirer July 5.

Natter credits this insight to his SKMC mentor, Steven Herrine, MD, vice dean for academic affairs and undergraduate medical education.

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Promote Health and Green Space One Empty Lot at a Time, Faculty Members Write in Philadelphia Inquirer

For Philadelphia, a city with high poverty rates and poor health outcomes, creating more parks close to where people live can greatly improve overall quality of life, wrote University faculty members Kim Douglas and Drew Harris in the Philadelphia Inquirer June 29.

“Can we imagine a city where every child or adult lives within 30 seconds of a green space?” said Douglas, director of the landscape architecture program and the Lab for Urban and Social Innovation at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University), and Harris, assistant professor at the College of Population Health. “An oasis of calm, where they can walk, run, play or just relax. Philly has great parks, but too few are near where they’re needed. We can fix this.”

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Jefferson Launches the Nation’s Only University-Based Cannabis Science Graduate Certificate Programs

This fall, The Lambert Center will launch graduate certificates in Cannabis Medicine and Cannabinoid Pharmacology, both the first of their kind. In 2019, the Cannabinoid Chemistry and Toxicology Graduate Certificate will be launched.

The Lambert Center will launch graduate certificates in Cannabis Medicine and Cannabinoid Pharmacology this fall.

With 30 states now allowing the use of medical marijuana, the multi-billion dollar legal cannabis industry is projected to be one of the fastest-growing sectors of the U.S. economy in the next decade.

Until now, healthcare providers, researchers and industry professionals have found few credible, evidence-based educational options to learn about the health benefits and risks of cannabis in appropriate clinical settings to treat chronic pain and other conditions such as multiple sclerosis spasticity or epileptic seizures.

To address this need, The Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis and Hemp at Thomas Jefferson University has created the nation’s first—and only—university-based, graduate-level certificates in cannabis education for healthcare and industry professionals.

“With the ever-evolving legislative and regulatory environment, accumulating data and diverse political commentary on the topic of medical marijuana, there exists a vast knowledge gap,” said Charles Pollack, MD, director of the Jefferson Institute of Emerging Health Professions and The Lambert Center. “Our goal at The Lambert Center is to help expand the knowledge base of scientists and clinicians—physicians of every specialty, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and pharmacists—and these new programs will help advance the knowledge and treatment around medicinal cannabis.”

This fall, The Lambert Center will launch graduate certificates in Cannabis Medicine and Cannabinoid Pharmacology, both the first of their kind. In 2019, the Cannabinoid Chemistry and Toxicology Graduate Certificate will be launched.

Prescriptions for cannabis have not been written since 1937, when medical marijuana was made illegal. That means most practicing medical professionals have learned only about the drug’s abuse potential and little about its clinical applications. It was only in the 1980s that scientists began to clarify the body’s endocannabinoid system, which provides our current understanding of how cannabinoids may work in the treatment of various diseases.

Still, many medical professionals today are hard-pressed to answer patient questions about the efficacy of cannabis products and the associated pros and cons, and Jefferson’s new programs promise to fill the gap.

The Cannabis Medicine Certificate will target clinicians who want a higher level of knowledge about safe and appropriate medicinal cannabis to incorporate into their practices. Pharmacological and pathologic concepts and current treatments of diseases for which cannabinoid compounds have been demonstrated to be therapeutic will be covered and supplemented with peer-reviewed research data on cannabis therapy as an adjunct or replacement for conventional therapy. The program will also include a comprehensive review of the social, political and cultural landscape in which the current debates occur.

The Cannabinoid Pharmacology Certificate, targeting scientists and researchers, will explore the ways cannabis affects the human body, as well as how the body metabolizes and excretes cannabis and cannabinoids.

The Cannabinoid Chemistry and Toxicology Certificate will give those working in regulation of the legal cannabis industry, as well as scientists, an understanding of cannabis botany and propagation, products and biological samples and principles of quality control for cannabis-containing products.

All three certificate programs are offered in partnership with the Center for Forensic Science Research & Education (CFSRE) at the Fredric Rieders Family Foundation, which has been at the forefront of the forensic community, providing novel developments in research, training and education in the forensic sciences for more than 20 years.

Each year-long certificate program offers four three-credit academic courses focused on evidence-based medicine. Ten of the 12 graduate courses will be offered entirely online. The Cannabinoid Chemistry and Toxicology Certificate requires two hybrid courses that include both in-person didactics and laboratory exercises at CSFRE’s state-of-the-art research and teaching facility in Willow Grove, Pa.

The cannabis certificates are part of several new certificate programs from Jefferson’s Institute of Emerging Health Professions, which endeavors to provide innovative and unique education and training to fill future career, training and certification gaps in healthcare practice and delivery.

Jefferson’s Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis & Hemp is the nation’s only comprehensive academic resource for education, research and practice pertaining to the potential use of cannabinoids as medical therapy.

For more information about the certificate programs, click here.

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Professor Sztandera Discusses the Jefferson Nexus Design Factory in Poland

Professor Les Sztandera spoke to Warsaw University faculty and students, as well as science and business leaders and members of the media.

Professor Les Sztandera spoke to Warsaw University faculty and students, as well as science and business leaders.

Les Sztandera, professor of computer information systems, attended the opening of the Warsaw Design Factory at the Warsaw University of Technology last month. He presented on the University’s industry-sponsored projects, such as the recent Product Design Gala, and the Jefferson Nexus Design Factory.

Like Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University), Poland’s Warsaw Design Factory is part of the Design Factory Global Network, an international partnership designed to foster innovation across cultures, continents and industries.

The audience included Warsaw University faculty and students, as well as science and business leaders and members of the media.

Jefferson launched the first Design Factory in North America in 2015.

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Mark A. Sunderland Talks to “Good Morning America” About Sun-Protective Apparel

Mark A. Sunderland, director of Jefferson’s textile materials technology program, was interviewed on ABC’s “Good Morning America” about UPF clothing that can protect from the sun.

Watch the July 3 segment here.

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Fashion Students’ Dresses on Display at Macy’s to Raise Awareness About Women’s Heart Health

The red gowns created by fashion design students are the product of an annual collaboration between Jefferson and the American Heart Association.

Now on display at Macy’s, the red gowns are the product of a collaboration between Jefferson and the American Heart Association. The red dress has become a symbol of efforts to raise awareness about heart health in women.

The four winning student designs from the American Heart Association’s Rock the Red Runway fashion show are now on display in a Macy’s Center City window until the end of July.

The stunning red gowns created by fashion design students Sahin Naznin, Vanessa Fath, Devon Kremmelbein and Noel Watt are the product of an annual collaboration between Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) and the American Heart Association to raise awareness about women’s heart health. The students designed the dresses as part of a junior year course taught by Anne Hand, associate professor of fashion design.

“We’re thrilled for our students to showcase their incredible work and creativity in the historic windows of the Center City Macy’s, a beloved and long-established destination for Philadelphia fashion,” said Catherine Casano, fashion design instructor at Jefferson, who coordinates the fashion show. “The exposure at Macy’s not only is a young designer’s dream come true but also brings much-needed awareness to this important cause.”

The red dress has become a symbol of efforts to raise awareness about heart health in women. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States.

Read more about the fashion show here.

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Jefferson’s Health Design Lab Offers Pathway for Hospitals to Integrate Patient-Centered Design: MedCity News

One of the goals of Jefferson’s Health Design Lab is to create a new generation of physicians who not only know how to treat their patients but to help them develop the skillsets to solve problems in thoughtful, creative ways, MedCity News reported June 27.

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Celebrating Year One: The New Jefferson Continues to Evolve to Deliver Value and High-Impact Education

final-hero-with-text-1920x822One year after the official combination of Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University to create a new national preeminent professional university, Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) continues to evolve to deliver high-impact education and value for students in architecture, business, design, engineering, fashion and textiles, health, medicine, science and social science.

“Creative partnerships work,” said Stephen K. Klasko, MD, MBA, president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health. “This merger became national proof that the future is in the intersection of fields of thought. In fact, we want to keep challenging ourselves to think differently and see the future in new ways.”

Effective July 1, Jefferson will launch a new College of Rehabilitation Sciences and a College of Humanities and Sciences. In addition, the College of Health Professions will expand to add new programs, and the College of Biomedical Sciences will be renamed the College of Life Sciences to better reflect its new portfolio of undergraduate and graduate programs. These changes represent a realignment of departments and programs to optimize the academic experience for students.

As of July 1, the University will be made up of the following colleges and schools: College of Architecture and the Built Environment; College of Health Professions; College of Humanities and Sciences; College of Life Sciences; College of Nursing; College of Population Health; College of Pharmacy; College of Rehabilitation Sciences; Kanbar College of Design, Engineering and Commerce, including the School of Design and Engineering and the School of Business Administration; Sidney Kimmel Medical College; and the School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

Steven R. Williams, MD, will serve as dean for the College of Rehabilitation Sciences.

Steven R. Williams, MD, will serve as dean for the College of Rehabilitation Sciences.

This move is advancing Jefferson’s commitment to integrate its offerings by aggregating similar programs under unified leadership; leverage the tremendous faculty talent across the University; accelerate the growth through synergies among educational offerings; and create unique models for transdisciplinary teaching and learning.

In a June 22 commentary in the Chronicle of Higher Education, University Chancellor Stephen Spinelli Jr., PhD, described how an educational philosophy driven by overarching values and pedagogy served as the foundation for the merger of Thomas Jefferson University and Philadelphia University.

“Faculty and staff members and administrators from both legacy institutions are innovation-focused and forward-looking, and both campus cultures reflected a desire to be nimble, current and creative,” wrote Dr. Spinelli, who will become chancellor emeritus on July 1. “The two have equal numbers of undergraduate and graduate students, and we believe that the combination creates valuable options for students and that the scale of the combined entity enables sound economics for the University.”

As for early wins from the merger, Dr. Spinelli noted how applications and donations are up this year, and students and faculty members on both East Falls and Center City campuses have embraced the new Jefferson. (The freshman class is on pace to be 20 percent larger than last year, and East Falls campus is currently up 43 percent in transfer deposits.)

“We offer more accelerated pathways for students to complete undergraduate-to-graduate degrees in a shorter time,” he said. “Students have more opportunities for research and professional clinical sites, and medical researchers are thrilled to be working with design and engineering students.”

Recent transdisciplinary projects at Jefferson include a surgeon specializing in injury research and prevention collaborating with four engineering students to develop a safer youth sports helmet; undergraduate management and nursing students creating innovative solutions to the real-world problems of food insecurity and food deserts and the corresponding impact on patients’ health; and industrial design, physical therapy, occupational therapy and engineering students and faculty modifying an off-the-shelf ride-on car for a boy with special needs.

Mark L. Tykocinski, MD, provost, executive vice president of academic affairs and the Anthony F. and Gertrude M. DePalma Dean of the Sidney Kimmel Medical College, proudly shared numerous year one accomplishments that will lend themselves to future opportunities for the University. For example, the opening of the Jefferson Israel Center in Jerusalem will drive innovation, create unparalleled academic experiences for students and strengthen global relationships; the Jefferson Institute for Bioprocessing, which will provide state-of-the-art education and training in the fast-emerging field of biopharmaceutical processing, will open spring 2019; and the continued development of the Philadelphia University Honors Institute at Jefferson program—and potentially moving to an honors college—to dovetail with professions like design, architecture, textiles, fashion and health.

Recent transdisciplinary projects at Jefferson include industrial design, physical therapy, occupational therapy and engineering students and faculty modifying an off-the-shelf ride-on car for a boy with special needs.

Recent transdisciplinary projects at Jefferson include industrial design, physical therapy, occupational therapy and engineering students and faculty modifying a car for a boy with special needs.

“Students who enter this honors program will have deep immersion in their professional areas of interest,” Dr. Tykocinski said. “In a sense, we’re talking about a profession-tracked honors program, which would distinguish it on the national scene.”

Personally speaking, Dr. Tykocinski called the merger a time of professional “rejuvenation,” expanding his leadership horizons beyond the health realm—allowing him to do things like attend student fashion shows and judge student architectural portfolios.

“All these things become incredibly energizing at another key juncture in my own career,” he said. “I firmly believe that the coming together of Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University is going to lead to something very, very special. Being one of the leaders who is giving life to this out-of-the-box merger is exciting.”

Below is additional information about the new College structure:

College of Rehabilitation Sciences
Effective July 2018, Steven R. Williams, MD, will serve as dean for the College of Rehabilitation Sciences and will continue in his role as the Jesse B. Michie Professor and chair of the department of rehabilitation medicine for Sidney Kimmel Medical College and enterprise senior vice president of post-acute and rehabilitation services for Jefferson Health.

The College now will include occupational therapy, physical therapy and athletic training, which had existed under the College of Health Professions and the College of Science, Health and Liberal Arts. Future plans for the College of Rehabilitation Sciences will include the establishment of departments of rehabilitation sciences and technology, speech and language pathology, and outcomes measurement, and divisions for the study of cognition, human engineering and design, and assistive technology. The College will leverage Jefferson’s recognized leadership in the fields of occupational therapy, physical therapy, rehabilitation medicine, orthopedics and the neurosciences to create leading-edge academic and research programs.

“I have always loved my interactions with students and helping them to find their career,” Dr. Williams said. “I look forward to creating programs that will be unique in terms of educating students to provide high-quality care that will integrate people back into their communities.”

College of Health Professions
Effective July 2018, Michael Dryer, PA-C, DrPH, will serve as dean for the College of Health Professions. Dr. Dryer was formerly the executive dean for the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts.

The College will include the following programs: community and trauma counseling and art therapy; couple and family therapy; disaster medicine and management; medical laboratory sciences and biotechnology; midwifery and women’s health; physician assistant program (Center City, East Falls and New Jersey campuses); and medical imaging and radiation science.

“We are very fortunate,” Dr. Dryer said. “We have an amazing group of faculty and have students come from all over the country to study with us. We’re looking at ways to provide the best possible experience. We have created many innovative programs, and we have several others being developed that will expand the offerings at Jefferson.”

College of Humanities and Sciences
Effective July 2018, Barbara Kimmelman, PhD, will serve as dean for the College of Humanities and Sciences. Dr. Kimmelman was the academic dean for arts and sciences in the College of Science, Health and the Liberal Arts, and professor of history. The College will include the programs of biopsychology, communication, law and society, and psychology and will house the Hallmarks Program for General Education.

Faculty in the College represent a wide range of disciplines, including African American studies, American studies, anthropology, history, international studies, languages, philosophy, mathematics, physics, sociology, and writing and rhetoric. Both the majors and the Hallmarks Program are characterized by strong disciplinary training enriched by transdisciplinary collaboration within the College and across other Jefferson Colleges, Dr. Kimmelman said.

“I am very proud of the curriculum we deliver,” she said. “This is knowledge and sets of skills that students will take with them throughout their lives, through any possible change in their profession and range of interests.”

College of Life Sciences
Effective July 2018, Gerald Grunwald, PhD, dean of the former College of Biomedical Sciences, will serve as dean of the College of Life Sciences, which will add biology, biochemistry, chemistry and pre-med undergraduate programs to its offerings.

The Jefferson leadership team at last year's combination ceremony.

The Jefferson leadership team (and Phil the Ram) at last year’s combination ceremony.

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Chancellor Spinelli Shares Merger Lessons in the Chronicle of Higher Education

With merger on the minds of many higher-education leaders, University Chancellor Stephen Spinelli Jr., PhD, shared lessons from the experience of the new Jefferson (Philadelphia Unversity + Thomas Jefferson University) in a June 22 commentary in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

“An educational philosophy driven by overarching values and pedagogy is the foundation of our merger,” Dr. Spinelli wrote. “Faculty and staff members and administrators from both institutions are innovation-focused and forward-looking, and both campus cultures reflected a desire to be nimble, current, and creative. The two have equal numbers of undergraduate and graduate students, and we believe that the combination creates valuable options for students, and that the scale of the combined entity enables sound economics for the university.”

Read the full commentary here.

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